PROFESSOR THADDEUS LOWE

MOUNT LOWE RAILWAY 

Ye Alpine Tavern - Mt Lowe Tavern

The Alpine Tavern was in harmony with its name and surroundings - simple and unobtrusive, following the contour of the countryside and yielding to save the oak trees. It was built of pine with open timber construction and a granite foundation. Up the steps and inside its broad doors all was generous mountain hospitality. Mount Lowe, The Railway in the Clouds, page 173.

Alpine Tavern in the 1890s (Courtesy of the Los Angeles Public Library)

Passengers on the Mt. Lowe Railway were delighted to find the Alpine Tavern awaiting them at the end of their long journey. During cold weather, the great fireplace would be burning, inviting them in to warm themselves. Professor Lowe wanted the Tavern built with as little damage to the surrounding trees as possible. The stone and wood building held the dining room, lobby, and rooms for guests to stay. Historic Mount Lowe, p. 71

Alpine Tavern with guests & trolley in foreground (Courtesy of the Los Angeles Public Library)

The formal opening of the Alpine Division of the Mount Lowe Railway and Ye Alpine Tavern was held on December 14, 1895. Historic Mount Lowe, page 71

Alpine Tavern with guests on upper deck (Courtesy of the Los Angeles Public Library)

The greatest changes were made to Ye Alpine Tavern in 1924-25. The main tavern was enlarged to accommodate more patrons and the name was changed to The Mount Lowe Tavern. Additional cabins were built and a large cottage, known as the Bungalow was constructed. The addition of tennis courts, shuffle board and ping-pong tables added to the fun for visitors to the Mount Lowe Tavern. Historic Mount Lowe, pages 71-72

Alpine Tavern guests sitting on deck  (Courtesy of the Los Angeles Public Library)

Following the loss of the buildings on Echo Mountain in 1905, the Tavern and the surrounding area became the main attraction to visitors to this mountain wonderland. The round trip excursion from Los Angeles cost $2.00; from Pasadena, $1.75. For those wanting to stay at the beautiful tavern, rooms were $5.50 to $7.00 per day; with bath, $7.00 to $7.50 per day. A two room cottage for two persons could be had for $3.00 to $4.00 per day; $15.00 to $20.00 per week. To complete the stay, breakfast was 75 cents; luncheon or dinner $1.25 weekdays, $1.50 Sundays and holidays. Historic Mount Lowe, pages 72

Alpine Tavern looking west (Courtesy of the Los Angeles Public Library)

Although the Alpine Tavern was over a mile high, it still retained all the comforts of city living. Rooms in the hotel were simple, clean, and comfortable. Amusements included a billiard table, card room, and a circulating library of current fiction. The Music Room had an excellent dance floor, and during the summer an orchestra was in residence. At other times the entertainment was provided by a phonograph, or later, a radio. Mount Lowe, The Railway in the Clouds, page 179.

Alpine Tavern interior focusing on the fireplace (Courtesy of the Los Angeles Public Library)

In the evening it was customary for guests to gather in front of the great fireplace. There was a large dining room, and postcards and other Mount Lowe souvenirs could be bought in the lobby. Mount Lowe, The Railway in the Clouds, page 179.

Photo of Alpine Tavern ruins in 1950 by Joseph Ferm great grandson of Thaddeus Lowe - Webmaster Collection


INDEX PAGE

BEFORE THE WAR

CIVIL WAR YEARS

INVENTIONS AND INDUSTRY

NORRISTOWN PENNSYLVANIA YEARS

PASADENA CALIFORNIA YEARS

MOUNT LOWE RAILWAY

AFTER THE RAILWAY

LOWE FAMILY

BOOKS ABOUT LOWE

NEWSPAPER ARTICLES

EVENTS AND REUNIONS

ARTIFACTS AND HISTORY

ENCYCLOPEDIA BIOGRAPHY

ACCLAMATIONS AND AWARDS

LINKS TO OTHER THADDEUS LOWE WEBSITES