PROFESSOR T.S.C. LOWE

BEFORE THE CIVIL WAR

Library of Congress - Courtesy of University of Eastern Oregon Professor Carol Lauritzen

Japanese Delegation in Philadelphia to see Professor Lowe's Balloon - 1860


Japanese Delegation in Philadelphia to see Professor Lowe's Balloon - 1860

Japanese Delegation in Philadelphia to see Professor Lowe's Balloon - 1860


Japanese Delegation in Philadelphia to see Professor Lowe's Balloon - 1860


Japanese Delegation in Philadelphia to see Professor Lowe's Balloon - 1860


Japanese Delegation in Philadelphia to see Professor Lowe's Balloon - 1860

Memoirs of Thaddeus S.C. Lowe - pages 21-22.

Commodore Perry had visited Japan, and had as we know, created a most favorable impression. A few years later the Japanese Government decided that some reciprocal movement was necessary, and sent a large embassy to this country to thank us. This was made up of nobles and distinguished men of Japan, and in due time they arrived in Philadelphia. The city desired to impress them, and as I had something which the Japanese had never heard of, I was invited to entertain them with an Aeronautic fete, which gave me much pleasure, and that I created an impression which lasted for several generations I will show.

The fete day was in the nature of a reunion, as Commodore Perry and all of his officers available were in attendance, as well as the elite, science and beauty of Philadelphia. My big air-ship was on exhibition, and Professor John Cresson, President of the Franklin Institute, made an address on aeronautics, and thoroughly explained to the Japanese (through the aid of an interpreter) the modus operandi of going into the clouds without any visible power. Whether the Japanese gentlemen grasped the idea, I do not know, but they were certainly charmed and delighted. Years after, I met a young officer on a modern Japanese frigate, and he told me that his father was one of the Embassy, and had told him, as a child, of the wonderful American ship that sailed in the air.

I had first selected one of my balloons that had an ascending power of about 800 pounds. This was to demonstrate rapidity of ascent, and when my assistant stepped into the basket and gave the word, the balloon shot upward with such marvelous rapidity that the Japanese fell back amazed - looking up - then at me - silenced by the magic of it all, as before they knew what had happened, the balloon was a mere atom in the sky.

It was then my privilege to entertain them. I had selected one of the largest balloons and had it decorated with Japanese flags. The leader of the Navy Yard band was present, who was with Commodore Perry in Japan, and as I and some friends cast off, played the Japanese national air.

INDEX PAGE

BEFORE THE WAR

CIVIL WAR YEARS

INVENTIONS AND INDUSTRY

NORRISTOWN PENNSYLVANIA YEARS

PASADENA CALIFORNIA YEARS

MOUNT LOWE RAILWAY

AFTER THE RAILWAY

LOWE FAMILY

BOOKS ABOUT LOWE

NEWSPAPER ARTICLES

EVENTS AND REUNIONS

ARTIFACTS AND HISTORY

ENCYCLOPEDIA BIOGRAPHY

ACCLAMATIONS AND AWARDS

LINKS TO OTHER THADDEUS LOWE WEBSITES