PROFESSOR THADDEUS LOWE

NEWSPAPER ARTICLES

Finally, cleanup plan for boulder-clogged Rubio Canyon
Associated Press: Los Angeles Metro Area (CA) - Thursday, January 25, 2007

A deal for clearing boulder-clogged Rubio Canyon has been reached, ending an eight-year dispute between environmentalists and forest officials over how best to handle it.

A 1998 landslide, caused by relocation of a water pipe, blocked the Angeles National Forest canyon above Pasadena with 50,000 tons of boulders. Remnants of the historic Mount Lowe Railway and six waterfalls were buried.

Hikers and historians despaired that cleanup could take years and cost $6 million, but a freak 2004 rainstorm swept away most of the debris. The waterfalls Moss Grotto, Ribbon Rock, Grand Chasm, Lodged Boulder, Roaring Rift and Thalehaha re-emerged largely unscathed.

The cleanup will include blowing up large boulders and distributing the chunks throughout the canyon.

Remnants of the railway, a pioneering hydroelectric plant and buildings constructed as a circa-1890s tourist attraction by promoter Thaddeus S.C. Lowe , will be preserved in an effort to have the site included in the National Register of Historic Places, U.S. Forest Service ranger Marty Dumpis said.

"I have decided to lay down the sword for the time being and accept Ranger Dumpis' invitation to become involved in the restoration," said environmental activist Paul Ayers, who has led the Rubio Canyon restoration campaign.

The Mount Lowe Railway carried more than 3 million riders during the 41 years it operated, starting in 1893. Its narrow-gauge cars clung to the mountain along a 3-mile route.

INDEX PAGE

BEFORE THE WAR

CIVIL WAR YEARS

INVENTIONS AND INDUSTRY

NORRISTOWN PENNSYLVANIA YEARS

PASADENA CALIFORNIA YEARS

MOUNT LOWE RAILWAY

AFTER THE RAILWAY

LOWE FAMILY

BOOKS ABOUT LOWE

NEWSPAPER ARTICLES

EVENTS AND REUNIONS

ARTIFACTS AND HISTORY

ENCYCLOPEDIA BIOGRAPHY

ACCLAMATIONS AND AWARDS

LINKS TO OTHER THADDEUS LOWE WEBSITES