PROFESSOR T.S.C. LOWE

BEFORE THE CIVIL WAR

Library of Congress - Special Thanks to Steve and Patrice Demory

Consoling Letter from Percival to His Brother Thaddeus - November 23, 1859

Consoling Letter from Percival to His Brother Thaddeus - November 23, 1859

Consoling Letter from Percival to His Brother Thaddeus - November 23, 1859

The letter reads:

Denver City

Nov. 23./59

Dear Brother -

Yours of this inst recd. I have heard & read much of your balloon - Am truly sorry to hear of the accident that happened to it, but that all is for the best, we cannot doubt. I hope so at least, I must confess I am very much worried for the result, - the lateness of the Season Seems to me to be one great objection. If it was Summer I would not think so much of it, but the winter cold must be a great draw back - the suffering you may reasonably expect, is dreadful to think of. In fact I hardly know what to think - God knows I hope you may be successful, but fear for the result - If you think best to go, I can only say, be confident of success. May God be with you and your undertakings.

If I could possibly leave my business I would come in at once but you must recollect that all I have in the world, - all that I have worked for, for years, is at Stake & if I do not attend to it, all is lost. I will try to get to New York in about six weeks - sooner if possible. You may be sure that My Heart is with you, that anything I can do for you, will be done with pleasure. Give my kindest regards to your family. Tell them I will try to see them as soon as possible. I shall certainly call on your wife this winter - sometime - in fact as soon as possible. If you cannot write me, please tell your wife to do so.

Our new goods have arrived, we are very busy, so you must excuse all Scribbling, I am really in a hurry. That all may be well with you, is my constant wish.

Your Brother - truly &

Affectionately,

P.G. Lowe

Notes by Steve and Patrice Demory

This two sided letter was written to Thaddeus Lowe by his brother Percival Green Lowe on November 23, 1859 from Denver City and addressed to Thaddeus' home on Rose Street in New York City. To put it in context, here is some of the background on the events discussed. The letter is transcribed with all punctuation, abbreviations, spelling and grammar as it appears. The letter was examined and photographed by Steve and Patrice Demory in November 2010, at the Manuscript Division or the Library of Congress in Washington DC and is part of the "Lowe Papers" in the collection of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics.

The first paragraph is Percival's reaction to Thaddeus' plans to fly his balloon, the "City of New York" across the Atlantic Ocean. More can be read on this in the book Military Ballooning by F. Stansbury Haydon, pages 157-162.

The second paragraph discusses a business Percival was building in Denver City with his friends George, William Clayton, and Jerry Kershow of Philadelphia. Clayton, Lowe & Company was a mercantile business selling supplies to miners and prospectors in the rapidly growing city during the Pike's Peak gold rush. Details can be read in Percival's book Five Years a Dragoon, pages 277-280. Percival's concern for Thaddeus and his references to Thaddeus' wife, Leontine, and his family give evidence to the closeness of he and his brother. The first sentence of this letter uses an old abbreviated phrase "Yours of this instant received."


INDEX PAGE

BEFORE THE WAR

CIVIL WAR YEARS

INVENTIONS AND INDUSTRY

NORRISTOWN PENNSYLVANIA YEARS

PASADENA CALIFORNIA YEARS

MOUNT LOWE RAILWAY

AFTER THE RAILWAY

LOWE FAMILY

BOOKS ABOUT LOWE

NEWSPAPER ARTICLES

EVENTS AND REUNIONS

ARTIFACTS AND HISTORY

ENCYCLOPEDIA BIOGRAPHY

ACCLAMATIONS AND AWARDS

LINKS TO OTHER THADDEUS LOWE WEBSITES